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Everything Greyhound > Greyhound Stuff!! > How to make martingale collars


Posted by: dad2paisley Jul 10 2011, 09:49 PM
From member JudiK

This may take multiple posts because it is going to be LONG. But, for starters, I use the 1 1/2" seatbelt webbing from Seattle Fabrics, it is very smooth and does not need to be lined for even the most delicate necks:

http://www.seattlefabrics.com/webbing.html#1%BD_Nylon_Seatbelt_Webbing

I buy my 1 1/2" hardware from Classic Design Works because it is good, heavy hardware:

http://www.cdwplus.com/brassL.html

I use regular thread to sew the colorful fabric to the webbing, but I use a very strong thread to sew the collars together and sew the hardware in:

http://www.sewtrue.com/Thread.html#Anchor-%233-56210

The colorful coverings for the collars are simply good quality quilting cotton. I also use Wonder-Under and fusible interfacing, a rotary cutter, rotary cutter ruler and a rotary cutting mat.

Each collar will require a 20" length of webbing, a 12" length of webbing, two loops, one slide, and a D ring.

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To make 1 1/2" wide collars, you will need to cut 2" wide strips of the colorful fabric.

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In addition, you will need to cut 1 1/2" wide strips of the fusible interfacing and 1/4" wide strips of the Wonder-Under.

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Grab a pair of scissors and head to the ironing board. Cut the 1 1/2" strips of fusible interfacing into 20" lengths and 12" lengths. To make a collar use one of the 20" pieces and one of the 12" pieces. Center them on the WRONG side of the 2" wide strips of colorful fabric, fusible (bumpy) side down - leave 2" between the interfacing strips. Iron the interfacing on the cotton, on the wool setting, to fuse. Cut strips apart with about 1" of fabric sticking out beyond the edges of the interfacing.

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Next, place 1/4" strips of Wonder Under at the edges of the interfacing, bumpy side down, and iron on WOOL setting to fuse to back of interfacing.

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Peel the paper backing from the Wonder Under:

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Now turn the edge of the fabric over and fuse it to the underside of the interfacing to eliminate unfinished edges on your collars:

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You are ready to sew the fabric onto the webbing. Sew close to the edges - less than 1/4 " - and always leave plenty at the ends to wrap around (3/4 - 1").

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Fold the excess fabric down one time to touch the edge of the webbing:

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Fold the fabric over again and sew over the edge of the webbing:

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You now have a strap set, all you need to do is add the hardware and you will have a collar. It is 1:30 AM and I am beat. I will add a 2nd post tomorrow to explain how to attach the hardware that makes a strap set into a collar.

Posted by: dad2paisley Jul 10 2011, 09:51 PM
You are ready to assemble the strap sets into a collar. I make the smaller part of the collar first, (the part that contains the D-ring) because it is a pain-in-the-neck and I like to get it over with. So - take the smaller strap, slide the two loops over the strap and down to the center. Overlap the ends by about 1" and secure with a very small binder clamp (I buy them at Office Depot and keep about 30 on hand.)

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The next step is important - stitch the overlapping edges of the small loop about 1/4" from the edge, AT THE END FURTHEST FROM THE BINDER CLAMP. I use a zipper foot to construct all of my collars so that I can get close to the hardware. THIS IS WHERE YOU BEGIN TO USE THE HEAVY DUTY UPHOLSTERY THREAD. I stitch across once, then backup all the way back across to lock that stitching in. Then I move 1/4" in from the edge and do it all again. At this point I have two separate rows of stitching.

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Now it's time to remove the binder clip and slide the D-ring under the flap of collar that has not yet been stitched down.

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The last step in making this small loop, is to stitch as close as possible to the D-ring then backup all the way to where you began stitching. Move over 1/4" and repeat stitching. Finally, put in another row to hold down any part of the strap that would stick up.

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Your small loop is now complete and should look like this:

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Posted by: dad2paisley Jul 10 2011, 09:53 PM
The big loop is way easier. Begin by grabbing your long strap and the metal "slide" as shown:

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The middle part of the slide needs to be behind the strap, with the strap passing over top as shown:

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Back to the sewing machine - this is the easiest stitching you will do, it's nice and flat! Some folks make a box with an "x" over top, some sew squiggles, you can be creative here. I might choose any of the above, but usually I put in two rows (forward and back) 1/4 inch apart, close to the metal slide and two more rows close to the edge of the strap.

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You are now ready to assemble the collar and put in the last rows of stitching. You need the small loop with the D ring and the long strap with the slide. Lie the small loop on a flat surface, with the D ring facing toward you and the metal "loops" at either side as shown.

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Now insert the long strap into one side loop , webbing up, as shown:

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Continue pulling the webbing through the loop until you get to the metal slide. Slide the webbing under the first side of the webbing, over the middle and out the other side as shown below:

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Posted by: dad2paisley Jul 10 2011, 09:54 PM
I'll bet that you could finish it without further instructions, but here they are anyway. Slide the end of the strap through the remaining loop. Overlap it upon itself by about an inch and put in one line of stitching (forward and back) as close to the hardware as you can get. Put in a 2nd set of stitches 1/4" away, and a third set to tuck the flap down.

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That is my process for making martingale collars. I managed to make about 200 of them last year and I donated all but a dozen (which I made for my 4 hounds) to various greyhound charities. SO - WHY DID I PUT THESE DETAILED INSTRUCTIONS UP SO THAT ANYONE WHO CAN SEW CAN NOW "STEAL MY PROCESS"? Because I cannot make all the collars that I want to make and I want anyone who can make collars for greyhound charities to compete with me. Please, make and give away more collars than I do! If you use these instructions to make collars for sale to line your own pocket, I don't want to hear about it. There are still hounds who never make it to their own sofa, and as long as we're not at 100% adoption, no one has the right to use my instructions to make a profit. I don't mind anyone making them for their own hounds, but these instructions are to be used mainly for the good of the hounds. With that said, some groups sell my collars in gift shops, at greyhound-related events or on the web. Some groups take a batch of my seasonal collars to Meet & Greet events and put them on the hounds to catch people's attention and start conversations. Some put them on foster dogs for the same purpose; some send new dogs home in my collars. The batch in production for most of these photos will be used on my dogs at the Pennsylvania Farm Show. If you look close, you can see the beginnings of my Valentine's Day collars and my Easter collars... If you come up with another use, please post it here for us all to implement.

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